protecting homes nationwide…

Modern building materials like wood, drywall, wallpaper, and fabric are excellent food sources for mold, while synthetic stucco building technology can leak and trap moisture inside.

in Stucco News

Read Entire Article

Pre-repair mold testing is always a good practice. Sometimes finding the exact source of the mold can be frustrating and difficult. Mold spores are everywhere – inside homes, up in the attic, in a home’s yard outside, living rooms, kitchens, etc. It is a question really of how much and what species of mold that is present. Some molds are worse than others in terms of toxicity. If a building smells moldy, for instance, hidden mold could be the culprit, but perhaps the source cannot be pinpointed. If it is known that there has been water damage and health problems are being reported then is it usually safe to assume that mold growth is present. Modern building materials like wood, drywall, wallpaper, and fabric are excellent food sources for mold, while synthetic stucco building technology can leak and trap moisture inside. Home appliances like washers, dryers and dishwashers also generate water vapors which again create the type of thriving environment conducive to mold infestation.

Mold can be very sneaky hiding in unseen places such as on the back side of dry wall, under wallpaper or paneling, on the top side of ceiling tiles, underneath carpets and pads, etc. Other places include areas inside walls around leaking or condensing pipes, wall surface behind furniture, inside air ducts, and even in roofing materials above ceiling tiles usually from roof leaks or poor insulation. Most home inspectors will use a professional grade moisture meter to help discover areas of moisture in a home that support mold growth. It is always good practice to look for a certified mold inspector that will work to resolve your mold issues on the lowest level possible. It is of course in the best interest of the consumer to hire a knowledgeable technician that uses common sense when deciding how a mold project should be completed. Homeowners can stay involved in the decision making process by asking the right questions.

Post a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Share This